Comparison Chart: Senate vs. White House Immigration Reform Plans

Wednesday Jan 30, 2013 | 0 Comment

Earlier this week, the Senate and President Obama released separate plans for reforming U.S. immigration law.  While both plans are short on details and neither has been signed into law, the chart below compares some key differences that affect groups such as undocumented immigrants, family-sponsored immigrants, immigrants educated in the math, science and technical fields and small businesses.

Senate Immigration Reform Plan 

 

White House Immigration Reform Plan

Path  to citizenship for undocumented immigrants delayed until U.S. borders secured

Immediate path to citizenship for many undocumented immigrants living in the U.S.

No increase in limit on number of family-sponsored immigrants from any one country

Increases annual limit of number of family-sponsored immigrants from any one country from 7 percent to 15 percent

Does not allow sponsorship of a same-sex partner

Allows sponsorship of a same-sex partner by U.S. citizens and permanent residents

Undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children would have a quicker path to citizenship

Undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children would have same path to citizenship as others, but could get citizenship more quickly by going to  college or serving for two years in the military

Would award green cards to immigrants who obtain advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math from American universities

Would award green cards to immigrants who obtain advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math from American universities

and

Would create a new visa category for highly skilled immigrants to work in federal science and technology labs on national security programs after being in the U.S. for two years and passing background checks

Undocumented farm workers would have a quicker path to citizenship

Undocumented farm workers would have the same path to citizenship

Creates an electronic system for requiring prospective workers to demonstrate legal status and identity with no exemption for small businesses

Over five years, phases in mandatory electronic employment verification, with exemptions for some small businesses

 

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